Tag Archive for 'mac'

Is Google the new Microsoft?

Microsoft—in a nutshell—is a company that had one successful product that we are all beholden to—that then used that capital to buy other people’s products and ruin them. They are not bad people, but they do stab their friends in the back. Also, they are a bunch of nerds, which is probably why they have never managed to produce a decent interface.

Google—in a nutshell—is a company that had one successful product that we are all beholden to—that then used that capital to buy other people’s products and ruin them. They are not bad people, but they do stab their friends in the back. Also, they are a bunch of nerds, which is probably why they have never managed to produce a decent interface.

Apple is a company that produces amazing, human-usable products. I love them for the same reason I love any such company, and I forgive them their eccentricities because their products are so amazing. They make decisions that I’m told are bad for me, yet I don’t see that reflected in their products as I use them.

-via motherfucker

The Definitive Guide to Syncing Blackberry With Mac OS X

For a long while, Mac users had to rely on third-party applications such as PocketMac or MissingSync to populate their BlackBerrys with contact, tasks, calendar data and media. RIM’s release of BlackBerry Desktop Manager for Mac brings first-party support for synchronizing data between Macs and Blackberry. The process however, isn’t always so simple. My personal experience syncing my Storm and my MacBook Pro had its share of seemingly inexplicable errors. After some fairly extensive research, I’ve found the answers to my two biggest problems.

1. My BlackBerry won’t mount on my Mac as a Mass Storage Device
Mass Storage Mode allows your phone to mount as any USB hard drive or flash drive would thus allowing you to copy files back and forth between the phone and your computer. Firstly, the phone needs to have Mass Storage Mode enabled. This is done by going into the phone’s options menu and then selecting “Memory.”

  • Media Card Support: On
  • Encryption Mode: None
  • Media Transfer Protocol (MTP): On
  • Mass Storage Support: On
  • Auto Enable Mass Storage Mode When Connected: Yes or Prompt

If you have these settings and your phone still won’t mount, the likely cause is a carrier unlock. Unlocking your phone disables Mass Storage Mode. To remedy the problem, iCrack has a patch to re-enable it. However, the patch runs on Windows only and doesn’t work in all circumstances. To manually enable Mass Storage Mode, you need to enter what’s called the Engineering Screens. Follow the directions from BerryReview to access the escreens:

To access the escreen, access the device “Help Me!” screen. For QWERTY devices, perform the key combination Alt+Shift+H on the home screen. For SureType devices, type Alt+EACE on the home screen. For SurePress devices, hold the Escape button, and tap the screen upper left, upper right, upper left, and upper right corners in that sequence.

The “Help Me!” screen contains the application version, PIN, and current up time. Without leaving the “Help Me!” screen, enter that information into the generator. The generator will give you the 8 digit code for the current “Help Me!” screen. If you close the “Help Me!” screen, the device uptime will no longer match the uptime used to generate the code.

Type the 8 digit code into the “Help Me!” screen. You will not see the digits as you type them, but once all 8 correct digits are entered, the escreen will activate. Make sure to use Alt for the numbers on QWERTY devices. Make sure to use multitap to enter the digits on SureType devices.

Once activated, the escreen will replace the “Help Me!” screen for the duration specified when generating the code. You can close the escreen earlier by setting your device clock ahead past the expiration time, reactivating the “Help Me!” screen, then setting your device clock back to normal. Note: Devices with a vendor ID of 1 (RIM engineering sample devices) will always have the escreen open.

Obtain the 8-digit code with this generator.

Once you’re at the escreen, click “OS Engineering Screens” and then “USB.” Select the seting for “Mass Storage (MS)” and click the BlackBerry button and choose “Toggle MS.” Now your BlackBerry should connect to your computer with no problem.

2. My BlackBerry experiences random sync errors telling me to “Retry Sync”
I really don’t have a good explanation for this one. Sometimes syncing contacts (or anything else) with BlackBerry Desktop Manager for Mac works, and other times, the sync fails telling me to retry. When you are receive an error message, hold down the option key and click on the sync services icon in the menubar and select Reset Sync Services. If you don’t have this menubar icon, go to System Preferences>MobileMe>Sync>Show Status in Menubar. Doing so will probably prompt you to reconcile some sync conflicts but hopefully you’ll only have to do this once.

I hope this helps any other BlackBerry and Mac user who’s experienced the same problems.

iPhone 3GS for Cheap

How to get an iPhone 3GS for cheap ($175 off) with Microsoft Bing’s Cash Back (via Alex King)

Old vs. New

Owning two sexy Apple computers, it’s not always easy deciding which one I want to use as my primary machine. The contenders’ general specifications are as follows:

MacBook Pro (Mid 2008):

  • 2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo Processor/2GB DDR2 RAM at 667 MHz
  • 160 GB hard drive @ 7200 rpm
  • 256 MB nVidia GeForce 8600M GT
  • 15.4″ matte LED-lit display
  • Illuminated Keyboard
  • 2 USB/1 Firewire 400/1 Firewire 800

Unibody MacBook:

  • 2.0 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo Processor/2 GB DDR3 RAM @ 1066 MHz
  • 160GB hard drive @ 5400 rpm
  • nVidia GeForce 9400M chipset
  • 13.3 LED-lit glossy display
  • Glass multi-touch trackpad
  • 2 USB ports

Ultimately, the performance is nearly identical. In real-world usage, the MacBook boots faster than the MacBook Pro, but I attribute this to the fact that there is significantly less occupying its hard drive. It’s hard to give up the MBP. While the unibody construction is sleek and very durable, the sentiental connection I have with my MBP is hard to get over.

The old MBP does have a few extra perks as well such as an ExpressCard slot. For most average users, this is hardly a point of significance. I can’t remember the last time I used any card-slot peripherals.

For those of you with older MBP’s considering a new laptop, I generally agree with what’s been said at Wired, and here. The conclusion seems to be that if you actually use more advanced features (card slot, firewire, do heavy film editing), stick with the pro. Otherwise, the new Unibody MacBook has closed the gap between pro and consumer models in a good way; save yourself some dough and go for the regular MacBook.

Microsoft is at it again

Following in the footsteps of their latest Laptop Hunter ads, Microsoft has created a new ad targeting the iPod. More specifically, the cost of filling an iPod with music. According to Microsoft, it’ll cost $30,000 to fill an iPod from using iTunes. Continue reading ‘Microsoft is at it again’

MacBook hinge

MacBook HingeI know this has been pretty well documented, but I never really paid much attention to this issue until now. The hinge on my unibody MacBook seems to be much looser than that on my previous generation MacBook Pro. In regular usage, it’s really not a big deal at all. I only notice occasionally when I set my laptop down; a slight (very slight) bump is all it takes to make the screen fall back a bit.

It’ll be interesting to see how this olds up a few months from now. I generally make it a point to take care of the hinge by not closing my laptop too abruptly. Anybody else experience any similar issues? What did you do about it?



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